A broader perspective on health and wellbeing

Enjoying an aromatic cup of tea is a universal language that transcends borders and has a rich history that stretches back millennia. In Asia, brewing tea is an art form that seeks to bring the drinker peace and serenity. It creates a warm, intimate atmosphere for friends gathering, or even for one in the pursuit of quietude. From intricate interior design to choice of location, these 7 stunning teahouses in Asia are an experience for the senses: 

The Sky Tea Terrace at Hoko Tea Farm – Shimizu Ward, Japan 

Floating on the side of the Ryogouchi Hills, the Sky Tea Terrace takes immersion in nature to another level. The wooden platform seats around five people, and is surrounded by the rolling green hills of the tea plantation with a breath-taking view of Mount Fuji. Part of the Hoko Tea Farm, the Sky Tea Terrace provides two types of local tea with sweets for guests to delight in.

The best time to visit the Sky Tea Terrace is in the early morning, with the mountains shrouded in mist and clouds that dissipate as the sun rises. Each slot is for 90 minutes and costs 3,000 yen per person, with a special charge of 5,000 yen per person before 6am.

To book a tea experience at the Sky Tea Terrace, visit their website here, or follow them on Instagram here.


Qing Zhu Tea House 青竺茶室 – Hangzhou, China

Photos courtesy of Qing Zhu Tea House 青竺茶室
Photos courtesy of Qing Zhu Tea House 青竺茶室
Photos courtesy of Qing Zhu Tea House 青竺茶室
Photos courtesy of Qing Zhu Tea House 青竺茶室
Photos courtesy of Qing Zhu Tea House 青竺茶室
Photos courtesy of Qing Zhu Tea House 青竺茶室

Nestled beside a hidden tea plantation just a mile away from Lingyin Temple, is the spacious two-story Qing Zhu Tea House. With its traditional Japanese-inspired interior and landscaping design, the tea house honours simplicity and natural design through its use of bamboo and wooden finishes, as well as the tatami-style private rooms. 

Guests have a choice between traditional tatami rooms or rooms with contemporary seating. For 256 RMB per person, there is an abundant selection of unique teas for guests to pick from, which are also accompanied with sweet sumptuous treats.

View Qing Zhu Tea House’s DianPing page here, or take a look at their RED profile page here.


CHA Talk Tea House 查小文茶客厅 – Hangzhou, China

Photo credit to Hao Chen via Air Architects – @air_architects
Photo credit to Hao Chen via Air Architects – @air_architects
Photo credit to Zha Wen via Air Architects – @air_architects
Photo credit to Zha Wen via Air Architects – @air_architects
Photo credit to Hao Chen via Air Architects – @air_architects
Photo credit to Zha Wen via Air Architects – @air_architects

The historic Dajing Alley in Hangzhou is lined with traditional houses, with the curious exception of CHA Talk Tea House. Designed by Miami-based Air Architects, from the traditional tiled roof, floor-to-ceiling glass windows, and a sloping light-transmitting curtain wall, this tea house is a passion project of Chá Wén, a local who is an experienced tea ceremony practitioner, seeking to create an authentic tea house.

The ground floor is a sleek space with a mixture of wood and concrete, and a bar table where the staff can serve and showcase their tea selection. The second floor has private tatami rooms that require a reservation and a space for more seasoned tea samplers. They have an ever-changing seasonal menu that follows the weather and the condition of their tea leaves.

To plan your visit to CHA Talk Tea House, view their Dianping page here, or follow their profile page on the RED app here.


Fujie Sabo – Tokyo, Japan

Yamamotoyama Fujie Sabo is an amalgamation of modern Japanese aesthetic and the 300-year-old tea brand. Family owned since 1690, this elegant tea house is located in the Nihonbashi district in Tokyo, and is a modern space featuring white walls, warm wood, and natural stone.

As a tea house that prides itself in its long pedigree, Fujie Sabo serves exclusive teas that are sourced from quality tea plantations across the country. For guests craving a sweet treat to balance the tea’s umami, their Nihonbashi Nagato seasonal wagashi confections (usually made with mochi and bean pastes) are a divine pairing. Fujie Sabo believes that green tea and nori – roasted seaweed – are the foundation of Japanese cuisine, thus guests are also encouraged to sample their simple menu that features their own Yamamotoyama nori in each light meal set. 

Explore what Fujie Sabo has to offer by exploring their website here, or follow them on Instagram here.


Cha Duk Bun 차덕분 – Incheon, South Korea

Photos courtesy of Cha Duk Bun – @thanks_to_tea
Photos courtesy of Cha Duk Bun – @thanks_to_tea
Photos courtesy of Cha Duk Bun – @thanks_to_tea
Photos courtesy of Cha Duk Bun – @thanks_to_tea
Photos courtesy of Cha Duk Bun – @thanks_to_tea

ChaDukBun is an 8th floor cafe in Incheon that has a panorama of the Yeongjong-do sea view, a short drive from Seoul. Although this teahouse doesn’t have private rooms, the lounge cafe has its seatings spaciously arranged, giving patrons ample personal space.

Guests have a choice of traditional raised wooden floor seating, regular tables, or a cozier tête-à-tête setting. They offer a selection of tea, which comes with dried persimmons and mini yakgwa (traditional honey cookies). Other traditional East Asia treats like monaka and persimmon rolls or western cakes are also on the menu for grazing. 

Explore what Cha Duk Bun has to offer and follow them on Instagram here.


Dear Teahouse – Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Photos courtesy of Dear TeaHouse – @dearteahouse
Photos courtesy of Dear TeaHouse – @dearteahouse
Photos courtesy of Dear TeaHouse – @dearteahouse
Photos courtesy of Dear TeaHouse – @dearteahouse
Photos courtesy of Dear TeaHouse – @dearteahouse
Photos courtesy of Dear TeaHouse – @dearteahouse

Dear TeaHouse’s bright and airy design is inspired by the Japanese concept of ikigai (a reason for being) and Scandinavian aesthetic. The latter is reflected in the selection of furnishings, whilst Vietnamese heritage and Japanese minimalist aesthetic are merged in the terrazzo flooring and the use of pine and oak wood.

The tea house has seasonal themes where they feature the influences behind the design and cultural heritage, such as an exploration of Kyoto and the Mekong Delta. They seek to be a refuge for urban souls and offer both hot and cold brew tea, with an online shop that delivers. Customers can also recreate their tea drinking experience at home by purchasing tea leaves that are packaged in a box designed with modern line art by local artist Vu Tuan Anh.  

To plan your visit to Dear Teahouse, visit their website here, or follow them on Instagram here.


DeHui Tea Space 得慧堂茶空間 – Beijing, China

Photo credit: Kin Lo Photos
Photo credit: Kin Lo Photos
Photo credit: Kin Lo Photos

With porthole windows set on a gleaming white wall, Dehui Tea Space is a standout in the old Hutong neighbourhood of Beijing. It embraces modernity and Chinese culture with its blue, purple walls, linen drapes, and stone steps on the white pebbled ground. The white linen serves as a divider in circles, part of the design by the Hong Kong studio Space Modification Unit, which represents togetherness in the Chinese culture.

They charge by the hour and offer patrons a choice of tea from a selection, which comes with sides of either fresh, candied, and dried fruit, or small snacks. In addition to tea drinking, the owners host floral arrangements, Kōdō (ceremonial incense), Diancha (simple tea ceremony), and various other classes throughout the year. 

To enjoy a tea session with friends at DeHui Tea Space, view their Dianping page here, or follow them on the RED app here.